FDA Fights Fraud. Plans to Test Imported Olive Oils.

 

The House Agricultural Committee finally has taken steps to stop the fraud and adulteration of olive oil coming from big corporations predominately in Europe. As we in the industry know, much of the bulk olive oils coming to the United States from Europe contain a large percentage of seed oils.

This is blatant fraud and does present a potential health risk to consumers. Certified Extra Virgin Olive oil should be only olive oil and nothing else. Seed oils mixed with olive oil should be clearly labeled and not called extra virgin. The California Olive Oil Commission has set standards for oils produced in California. This has sent shock waves through the European big corporate olive oil industry.

Truthful producers from around the world welcome this forward step toward transparency. At IL Fiorello we are proud to certify our oils, share the results with our guests and freely discuss our farming and milling practices. Honesty and transparency in the market place is the center of our business.

 

Ciao
Ann

 

 

Blossom Time

Frantoio BLOGThis is the expectant time of year where we watch for olive blossoms, blossom set and the resulting fruit set. Flower bud sprouting initiates the process of inflorescence. Average flowering used to be around May 10 but clearly with a change in climate we are seeing inflorescence now in mid-April. This year this is a full 4 weeks early. Temperature for the past two months have determined the time of flowering. Lower temperatures mean longer flowering periods, while high temperatures shorten flowering. Hail, frost, and very high winds may destroy flower buds. Water and nutrient stress between bud sprouting and six weeks before flowering reduce the number of flowers per inflorescence and increase the number of lost blossoms. So time will reveal what our actual crop will hold for us.

 

This is the first time that we as growers have a glimpse of what our crop may be in the fall.
And so far this looks like an amazing year at our groves. Some varieties will produce
heavily one yearZucchini BLOG and not the next, which is normal for olives. This year, as was last year, our Frantoio is productive & the Aglandau French variety has more blossoms than we have ever seen. It is during flowering that wind pollination occurs. A good book for reference is Olive Growing by Barranco, Fernandez-Escobar and Rallo, from the University of Cordoba, Barcelona, Spain, 2004.
As olives are wind pollinated, the winds of Suisun Valley are welcome. The word “Suisun” means “west wind”. Suisun Valley winds come in the afternoon from San Francisco and San Pablo Bay and bring cool temperatures. We would like to have the blossoms stay a little longer on the trees so as to have a really good fruit set. But in farming we do not have those choices, nature is fickle.

double BLOG

We do have bees on site for honey production and to help with the gardens and citrus pollination. Bees love the pollen and nectar in the olive grove but olives produce differently.

We use the Italian variety named Pendolino to help with pollination of all of our olives. This is a productive tree in its own right, and makes a beautiful green grassy tasting olive oil.

Bring on the Suisun wind to help pollinate our olives.

Here are blossoms from our Farm for you to enjoy.

Ciao

Ann

 

 

Celebrate – It is Spring

Planter BoxesTime to think about digging in the dirt, planning and planting your garden, and eating fresh vegetables.

Today it is softly raining and we have not yet finished mowing the olive groves. Some of the flowering mustard is as tall as my tractor. Nick, our assistant miller and super helper, keeps the tractor working, filling it with gas, and then sending me back out to mow some more. It is perfect in the grove. The olives are just about to begin blooming. The red wing black birds follow the tractor to pick up worms and bugs. No cell phones. No calls. Just me and the trees and the tractor. Happiness.

Nick and Araldo, our super work guy, have finished the raised vegetable beds. These raised beds are a showcase in front of the olive mill, all 34 of them. Each bed is 4’ x 10’, with chicken wire in the bottom to deter the gophers. This week we spent time planting radishes, onions, beans, chayote, and LOTS more. We envision a profusion of vegetables for our cooking classes and for our olive family. Our Chef is delighted that we are planting the raised beds behind the Visitor Center for herbs, cilantro, parsley, thyme, basil and tiny cucumbers (because they are so cute).  We use Baker Creek Seeds because of their sustainability and their commitment to wonderful products. I get lost in their catalogue, beautiful pictures and planting suggestions (www.rareseeds.com).

Tours of the gardens will be great fun as we watch all things green grow and mature. The new green house is warm and tidy and little tiny sprouts of seeds are popping up.

With great delight, I have been talking to garden clubs, Rotary, Kiwanis, and Chambers of Commerce, in Northern California. I have presented our Olive Farm and how we grow olives and make olive oil. We have had some lively discussions about the problem of adulterated olive oils, and how to pair good food with certified extra virgin olive oil. I have met some wonderful people, whom I now consider my friends.

Nick and Araldo Planter BoxesMuch thanks to Nick and Araldo for all their hard work building the raised beds and moving dirt.

Come play in the dirt, and watch us grow.  The radishes are up and growing.

Ciao

Ann

 

 

Weeds and Mushrooms

 

I want to pick your weeds!

A delightful lady walked into IL Fiorello’s visitor center asking if her mother could pick our weeds. My first response was, sure-we have lots! My more rational approach was “does she know what weeds are what” and will she be safe. Turns out she really knew her weeds.

Foragers are individuals who know and understand what grows, what is safe, and how to use the “weeds” that grow in the forest, in the groves, and on the side of the road. As Connie Green in her book The Wild Table, says “ the flavor of wild is sneaking back into our modern world”. What a shame, it should never have left.

When I was growing up in the Adirondack Mountains of really far upstate New York, my father’s friend would go out mushroom hunting. He would bring back 50 lbs of beautiful chanterelles. We would sauté them in butter, heap them on toasted fresh bread, eat like there was no tomorrow. All the rest we packed in containers for the freezer. He knew what he was doing both to find the mushrooms and only pick the safe one to eat. This was a truly memorable food experience. Mushrooms on toast are still my very favorite meal.

Not everyone can forage for mushrooms. Not everyone should forage for mushrooms. That is why we have a class on mushrooms, hosted with Mycopia mushrooms of Petaluma. We will all learn a lot from this class.

Maybe we should all learn about foraging for weeds also. Good weeds, tasty weeds, healthy weeds.

Be careful what you forage. Our organic garden will safely supply us with great vegetables and I am sure some good weeds.
Come visit

Ciao

weeds

 

FROM OUR HEART TO YOUR HEART

Health benefits of good food, good wine, and olive oil are being touted in the news. Of course this is true; add exercise and you have the perfect 4. What better grouping? Science is continuously looking closely at how complex human nutrition really is and what we can do to help ourselves. Sorry, there is no magic bullet. One glass of wine, or 2 tablespoons of olive oil (real olive oil) will not a healthy person make. But it is a start.

Some studies attribute better health to red wine, others to white, the more cautious to both. Most probably the interaction of both with a great diet, including olive oil, is the answer. As the lead investigator, Iris Shai, from Ben-Gurion University in Israel, states, “each individual could respond differently and should consult his practitioner first”. Sensible response, I have said that myself to lots of people. We all need a touchstone.

So here is a suggestion for helping your heart from our heart at IL Fiorello. Be kind to your friends for Valentine’s Day. Give them a bottle of really good tasting olive oil and cook a wonderful dinner of real food. Heed the Oldways Common Ground Consensus Statement: Food should be good for human health, good for the planet, and just plain good – unapologetically delicious.

Walk to the store and purchase these ingredients for dinner. Then walk home and prepare a lovely meal.

 

Mushroom and Cheese Bruschetta

6 tablespoons Organic IL Fiorello Extra Virgin Olive Oil – Frantoio

6 more tablespoons oil for drizzling on the bread

4-5 cups fresh mushrooms

Mycopia from Petaluma is a wonderful source (if you are not into your own foraging)

1-2 tsp oregano (chopped)

1-2 tsp thyme (chopped)

2-3 shallots or equivalent amount of finely chopped white onions

Mozzarella (sliced) or buratta (spooned) cheese

Baguette, sliced on the diagonal. Toast each slice and drizzle with olive oil

Salt and pepper to taste

Instructions

Sautée the onions and mushrooms in the olive oil about 5-6 minutes

Add the herbal seasonings to taste

Toast the bread and top with olive oil

Place the cheese on the bread

Add the mushroom and herb mixture on top

Drizzle with more oil

Garnish with chopped parsley or chives for taste and beauty

Arrange the finished bruschetta on a platter

Serve with a green salad of arugula and lettuce lightly seasoned with oil.

Accompany with a glass of red or white wine of your choice

Wine Suggestions:

Farmstrong Field White from Suisun Valley

Winemaker Faith Armstrong-Foster

Or try her Sparkling wine from their Onward label

A beautiful Petillant Naturel of Malvasia Bianca

Verduno Pelaverga from Piedmonte Italy

Turkovich Roussane from nearby Yolo County CA

Ciao.

 

HOW TO BUY GOOD OLIVE OIL — HONESTLY

Suisun Valley, California (January 5, 2016) – Called the Food of the Gods, olive oil, true certified extra virgin olive oil, is indeed a magical food. “This is an ancient food that deserves its place on the modern table,” say Mark and Ann Sievers of Il Fiorello Olive Oil Co. in Suisun Valley Northern California.  “It’s a shame that other countries simply haven’t enforced their standards when it comes to extra virgin olive oil.  It’s a matter of cost for them, but it’s a matter of purity and integrity for the consumer.”

A recent 60 Minutes (Sunday January 3, 2016) episode focused on the production and mis-labeling of poor quality oils in Italy.  “Guy Campanile, the producer of that segment on olive oil, should come to California during fall milling season, to smell and taste how wonderful our oils are, says Ann Sievers.  “It’s no wonder we fare very well in international competitions. Italy, Spain, France, and Greece make some good olive oils, but they usually keep the good oils for themselves. And as 60 Minutes showed, the multinational companies send adulterated oils out to the world.”

How can consumers tell the difference?  Il Fiorello offers some simple advice:  “If you find an inexpensive oil a grocery store, there’s a reason it is inexpensive,” says Mark Sievers.  “It may be old, bad, or adulterated or all three. This is indeed a buyers beware, or we like to say buyer be aware business. If the label on the oil says it is from 5 different countries you can be assured it is not good quality olive oil, and probably not even much olive oil.”

The 60 Minutes segment documented the adulteration of Italian olive oils with highly refined (read processed with heat and chemicals) vegetable oil–a silent issue that consumers are only now recognizing. “It’s too bad,” says Ann Sievers.  “If the label said olive oil and vegetable oil then consumers would know what they are buying.  But then, they probably wouldn’t buy it.”

It takes an enormous effort to make extra virgin olive oil: a whole years’ worth of growing, expensive harvesters, large machinery. And the oil must be only olive oil, and have a balance of bitterness, fruit, and pungency when it comes out of the mill. If it’s not, it is fraudulent, and that is not extra virgin olive oil. Unscrupulous makers add other chemicals to try to make up for the defects. “If you bring me good olives, we can make beautiful oil,” Says Ann Sievers. “If you bring me bad olives you will have bad oil, or none as we will not mill bad fruit. Come visit us and take a tour of our farm and olive milling, (not pressing) equipment during harvest time.  It’s an enlightening experience. The taste and aroma of fresh extra virgin olive oil will stay with you forever.”

According to the segment on 60 Minutes, because of the immense amount of adulteration and bad olive oil, consumers do not even know what good oil tastes like. Ann and Mark Sievers would like to change that.  “Certified extra virgin olive oil is truly a special product and should be paired with great food,” says Mark Sievers.  “Once you’ve tasted the real thing, you won’t ever want to go back to that stuff the big conglomerates sell.”

“It’s all about knowing your sources,” says Ann Sievers.  “Take the time to know where you food comes from, how it is made and how to protect your health and dollars.”

About Il Fiorello

ll Fiorello is one of the leading premium olive oil producers in the USA, with more than thirty gold medals won at national and international olive oil competitions around the world. They grow twelve varieties of olives—all from Italian, Spanish, French and Greek olive trees—twenty minutes from the more famous Napa Valley. Il Fiorello offers tours, tastings, and a full range of visitor experiences in their olive oil visitor center in Suisun Valley, CA.

Ciao!

Ann Sievers & Paul Wagner, Balzac Communications & Marketing

 

Happy, Healthy New Year

IL Fiorello wishes everyone a happy and healthy and prosperous New Year.

Enjoy our olive oil with good food and much happiness. Be thankful.

Doesn’t everyone make the usual New Year’s resolution to try to eat better to improve their health? I would suggest that it really is very simple. Follow some of the “food rules” by Michael Pollan- writer, author, Professor at UC Berkeley, and author of In Defense Of Food, (Penguin Press, 2008).

Pollan has three basic rules and they are:

Eat food. Meaning real food not packaged or manipulated

Not too much. Don’t over eat

Mostly plants. Consider a plant based diet, occasional meats are fine

If you are interested, watch the movie just released December 30, 2015, following his book In Defense of Food. It is a true common sense approach to the health issues (read “diabetes and obesity”) in the civilized world.

The following statements are taken from his writings:

  • “Eat food” means to eat real food — vegetables, fruits, whole grains, and, yes, fish and meat — and to avoid what Pollan calls “edible food-like substances.”
  • Don’t eat anything your great-grandmother wouldn’t recognize as food. Pollan says, “When you pick up that box of portable yogurt tubes, or eat something with 15 ingredients you can’t pronounce, ask yourself, ‘What are those things doing there?’”
  • Don’t eat anything with more than five ingredients, or ingredients you can’t pronounce.
  • Stay out of the middle of the supermarket; shop on the perimeter of the store. Real food tends to be on the outer edge of the store near the loading docks, where it can be replaced with fresh foods when it goes bad. Just a personal note, many markets now have fresh food front and center. Stay there to shop for real fresh food. 
  • Don’t eat anything that won’t eventually rot. “There are exceptions — honey — but as a rule, things like Twinkies that never go bad aren’t food,” Pollan says.
  • It is not just what you eat but how you eat. “Always leave the table a little hungry,” Pollan says. “Many cultures have rules that you stop eating before you are full. In Japan, they say eat until you are four-fifths full. Islamic culture has a similar rule, and in German culture they say, ‘Tie off the sack before it’s full.'”
  • Families traditionally ate together, around a table and not a TV, at regular meal times. It’s a good tradition. Enjoy meals with the people you love. “Remember when eating between meals felt wrong?” Pollan asks.
  • Don’t buy food where you buy your gasoline. In the U.S., 20% of food is eaten in the car.

 

Pollan often ends his presentation with a quote from Oscar Wilde, “everything in moderation including moderation.”

We are human and derive enjoyment from food.  So celebrate and enjoy, but be wise.

Ciao

The Best Day is the Day Oil is Born

 

OLIO NUOVO, new oil.

It’s full of pungency, olive bits, bitterness, texture, deliciously wonderful. This is the oil to pour over toasted bread like bruschetta.

Olio Nuovo is the best! Everyone should stand in line to taste this fabulous product. It’s a gift of nature, but not for the faint of heart- as this is a new and robust oil. Think of savory foods like steak, roasted pumpkin, potatoes or grilled eggplant.

Olive oil changes over time. So what is pungent and very robust today will become much milder over the next two years.  All the polyphenols and antioxidants, (only one small measure of oil quality) will also degrade over the next year. Olio Nuovo is immediately hand bottled the hour it is made and only available during the olive harvest, so limited quantities are on hand- use it often during the holiday season!

Take advantage of this wonderful tasting oil! The oil will never be better than the day it is born.

Celebrate Harvest, Celebrate Olio Nuovo.

CIAO

Ann

The Life of an Olive Oil Miller

I have not blogged lately because I have been very busy milling tons and tons of olives. We are very grateful this year for a bountiful harvest. It was an early harvest, and we have milled almost every day since September 21. This makes us all very happy to be making great oil, but also very tired at the end of our day!

We still have at least 3 more weeks to go, so I thought I would just give you a list of things an olive oil miller does every day…

The Life of an Olive Oil Miller

  • Waking up early to head off to the farm
  • Receive beautiful olives from new and returning clients
  • Taking photos of the olives, checking their temperatures and weights
  • Moving 100 lb. bins from one side of the mill to the other
  • Unloading 1000 lb. bins filled with olives with the forklift
  • Greeting the steady stream of clients delivering olives and picking up their freshly milled oil
  • Cleaning the mill before we begin milling
  • Moving 5 gallon jugs of olive oil milled last night, each weighing about 40 lbs. (Did you know that oil weighs 7.61 lbs. per gallon??)
  • Filling up the wash tank at the mill and trying not to get splashed with freezing cold water!
  • Wearing headphones, inside the mill, all day long to protect our hearing
  • Watching the olives mix into a beautiful, shimmery paste!
  • Carefully filling containers with beautiful fresh oil
  • Cleaning the machines in preparation for the next batch of olives
  • Cleaning the mill, wall to wall!
  • Heading home at 11P.M. after a long day’s work

We have been working alongside the outdoor construction workers, the film crew, and research scientists observing our property, because we strive to not only produce award winning oils…but to remain environmentally friendly!

Come and see the milling process, it is amazing!

Ciao

Ann

Harvest and Milling Season at Il Fiorello

Photo for Oct 2 blog copyAs we begin harvest and milling season, I am always reminded of the long history, culture, and memories of olive oil. With respect for this very ancient product, we make oil with new machines and very modern technology. Nick, our assistant miller, and I are taking again the Master Milling course at UC Davis to keep up with the modern technology and to reacquaint ourselves with our olive oil colleagues from around the world. We are a small group of people who are determined to make a quality product. New science and improved techniques are making better oil.

Nick took some of our freshly milled oil to a fellow farmer in Suisun Valley. When she smelled the oil she cried. Tears streaming down her face, she said that the fragrance brought back strong memories of her family in Greece.  She is 85 and could so clearly remember the fragrance and taste of olives and newly milled oil from her family farm. A potent and remarkable food memory.

This story is why we mill olive oil. Not for the gold medals, not for the sales but for respect of an ancient healthy food that deserves a place at the modern table©.

Come visit us as at IL Fiorello as we mill and enjoy good health and fond memories.

Ciao

Ann

Custom Milling

Bring us your olives to be crushed in our state of the art Italian mill.

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Tastings

Taste extra virgin and co-milled flavored olive oils.

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Il Fiorello Blog

Keeping you up to date on all things olive and olive oil.

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Custom Milling

Bring us your olives to be crushed in our state of the art Italian mill.

read more...

Tastings

Taste extra virgin and co-milled flavored olive oils.

read more...

Il Fiorello Blog

Keeping you up to date on all things olive and olive oil.

read more...